Survey On Government Strategy

Q1. How can we empower men and boys?

In its Draft Men's Health Strategy, the Government says it wants to improve men’s health by empowering men and boys. What action do you think we can we take to empower men and boys to live healthier lives? For more information see: https://bit.ly/2RKOoBd


    answered 2018-10-16 18:17:06 +1000
    Q: Q10. What actions will improve men’s health?
    A: Start early with education, get the message to young boys in primary school, secondary school, Uni and the workplace and in retirement.
    answered 2018-10-16 18:13:49 +1000
    Q: Q9. Including men and boys in gender equity work
    A: I have no comment as I am not familiar with this topic.
    answered 2018-10-16 18:13:02 +1000
    Q: Q8. Hearing men’s voices
    A: Yes very much so. Men need to be encouraged to stand up and speak out, celebrities and sports people who suffer disease and illness need to be telling their story, we hear about females entertainers surviving breast cancer but never from men who have survived testicular cancer.
    answered 2018-10-16 18:09:00 +1000
    Q: Q7. Supporting men in distress
    A: Life! We live in stressful and busy times. There seems to be stronger than previous peer pressure on some age groups and not just on the younger men. Distress comes in school, work and retirement. The National Men’s Shed movement is showing some great results with suicide prevention from retired men.
    answered 2018-10-16 18:06:36 +1000
    Q: Q6. Supporting fathers and fatherhood
    A: Education through GP’s and hospitals, many of the younger generation are not getting good positive experiences from there own fathers (unfortunately) so we need to get the knowledge to young fathers. maybe classes on parenting and fatherhood should be coupled to the baby bonus (if that is still a thing)
    answered 2018-10-16 18:04:02 +1000
    Q: Q5. Building men’s social connections
    A: If men are socially isolated how are you going to talk to them, first you need to get men to connect with society by encouraging the belonging to groups such as scouts, surf clubs. The youngeration is not engaging with social groups like the baby boomers so there needs to be more emphasis on social media. Some help is required to give these organisations access and knowledge of how to attract society to various organisations and to promote Men’s Health such as the Men’s SHed organisations
    answered 2018-10-16 17:56:31 +1000
    Q: Q4. Helping men and boys make healthy transitions
    A: Increase awareness through education in general and GP’s. Get it out in the community that men do have health issues and need to talk about them. Allow boys groups, scouts, football clubs etc to have trained men to talk about these issues openly and without fear.
    answered 2018-10-16 17:53:54 +1000
    Q: Q3. Breaking down the barriers to good health
    A: Young men especially are nor encouraged to talk about health issues, it is NOT taught at school and in most homes. The older generation need to be educated first, Bring back father & son nights at schools.
    answered 2018-10-16 17:51:55 +1000
    Q: Q2. Making health services work for men and boys
    A: Treat males like males, speak about role models to boys and stop reporting bad male behaviour as if it was a badge of honour. Show young boys that it is not sissy to take care of their own health, show that good eating is the way to a good life. Ban completely ads on TV that are negative to children’s health. Monitor so called children’s TV shows, especially cartons as these have become so realistic it has hard to work out what is fact or fiction.
    answered 2018-10-16 17:48:10 +1000
    Q: Q1. How can we empower men and boys?
    A: We need to give Boy’s good role models in society and send positive messages via news items and online reporting. More involvement by schools to teach old schools values and ideals about gentlemenly behaviour and awareness of the correct way to act.
    answered 2018-10-16 14:07:52 +1000
    Q: Q4. Helping men and boys make healthy transitions
    A: Every phase and transition from and to is important.
    The most important phase in my clinical opinion are the first years of life and childhood to late teens.
    Freud was partially right when he talked of the first 2 years of life informing the whole of life to come. Yet he was not a believer of the additional influences of later childhood and teenage experiences which dovetail into and inform the earlier periods of formative attachment and development.
    What Actions?
    Educate health providers about referral pathways
    Educate heath providers about alcohol and other drug (AOD) issues
    Create community based support groups around life transition issues
    Place male therapists in all medical centres, community centres etc.
    Again, address with non-judgement and with compassion and empathy the issues of patriarchal training by naming it at all life stages from childhood throughout life.
    answered 2018-10-16 13:29:41 +1000
    Q: Q3. Breaking down the barriers to good health
    A: This is deep and huge question and the barriers to men attending to their own health is equally deep and huge.
    I see in my work men being unavailable to themselves and this disconnect from their soulful, emotional selves propagates and promotes both organic and psychological un-wellness.
    In order to do so we need to challenge the very nature of our social inheritance i.e. the multi-generational training of boys into manhood (not just from a Euro-centric, Judaic-Christian paradigm.
    This work requires generational incremental change, yes there will be large shifts, but the majority of work will take generations to shift.
    This work would begin at early childhood, at pre and post natal stages, where fathers would be encouraged and supported throughout society to be intimately involved in the fathering/parenting of children. Onward into the school stage (not run by teachers but by therapists) to support family units, to educate, to offer examination and experimentation in how we as families raise, especially non verbally educate our boys to be men.
    answered 2018-10-16 13:18:46 +1000
    Q: Q2. Making health services work for men and boys
    A: Encourage and provide easier pathways for men to uptake educational activities to become empowered to support other men and boys.
    Appoint men to run, or at least to hold critical steering roles both clinically and organisationally in all Men’s treatment facilities and centres.
    Expand the overly narrow, analytical, pathological manner way we view human existence and interaction and include, and borrow from less bio-medical focused paradigms and look to eclectic, wholistic (not just in name only) and other societies programs to support men e.g. Scandinavian paradigms of treating schizoid disorders, US Men’s Movement, US Indian programs. Australian treatment centres such as South Pacific Private Hospital (Sydney) paradigms of relational treatment.
    answered 2018-10-16 12:53:31 +1000
    Q: Q1. How can we empower men and boys?
    A: I work in the allied health fields and have for almost 25 years. I have worked with men and boys (Indigenous and Caucasian) in Men’s psychological wellbeing.
    I believe we need to acknowledge the patriarchal trap that men have been held in and for the most part, due to their anthropological gender assigned disconnect been unaware of the consequences to themselves and others for millennia.
    Openly discuss the loss that this way of being has wrought on men, and their son’s.
    Acknowledge nationally in open dialogue the grief and loss that men carry, in isolation, due to this trapped existence.
    It appears that patriarchy is viewed predominantly as being male benefiting e.g. wages, control of institutions, physical dominance etc. On these overt levels it appears so but when we look just below the surface there tells a different tale. We know the statistics of male disempowerment and chaos, these I believe point to the cost to men of obedience to the patriarchy, a different yet same cost women have paid at the hands of patriarchy.
    Make a national initiative to stop the ridiculing and the shaming of men for not knowing their lack of emotional intelligence, and the weight of patriarchy in keeping them stuck e.g. advertising and the silent responses by men to some sectors of punitive, rage filled feminist influenced advertising that seems to see this form of belittlement as somehow productive and inclusive of men into the realm of changing patriarchal abuse paradigms.
    Celebrate the differences and uniqueness of gender.
    Stop shaming the energies of young boys; I hear all the time both women and men being patriarchally and maternally shaming and crushing of the beauty of boy energies.
    Initiate at school locations a national fathering program (run by therapists not teachers) to introduce fathers and sons to each other in ways unknown to them. teach and practice relational interaction in non-shaming environments facilitated by highly aware men’s work practitioners.
    Relieve women of the dual role of father & mother
    Stop the zeitgeist of women deciding, writing, and delivering e.g. ‘How to be Men, Men’s Behavioural Change, Boy to Manhood’ programs.
    I have much more to say and to offer.
    answered 2018-10-16 12:22:46 +1000
    Q: Q1. How can we empower men and boys?
    A: Mental health and communication.
    answered 2018-10-15 12:11:38 +1000
    Q: Q1. How can we empower men and boys?
    A: Build the capacity of the Older and Younger Men and allocate the necessary resources for what ever programs designed and implemented are successful
    answered 2018-10-15 11:01:01 +1000
    Q: Q10. What actions will improve men’s health?
    A: I think marriage and financial breakdown, deal with these biggies and the rest would be secondary
    answered 2018-10-15 10:59:49 +1000
    Q: Q9. Including men and boys in gender equity work
    A: Every gender should be considered for everything, should workplaces consider those who aren’t good for a job? No. Should there be 50% genders in workplaces by default, No, could the govern emend try it in their own workplaces, no , should they trail it as a gender utopia experiment , sure.. i think it is about business trying to make money not gender, if you have small hands you going to make a better Suzuki mechanic aren’t you.
    Gender equality should be considered, men’s stereotyped workplaces should have more women, why don’t they? In one of my jobs I worked in an abbitoir cutting guts to empty shit into a truck, and quite frankly I didn’t see many women licking their lips to have a go (mind you its not a job you lick your lips with until you wash your face first) i think Government need to look at gender and equality and make the playing field fairer, i still think if you went for a child care job at a preschool and got knocked back, when down to the transgender office changed genders and went for the job again it wouldn’t matter, there is going to be people making decisions based on ethics and considerations outside of what descrimination could be, its either for safety orwhos best and this should stay the same or be overhauled with everything, because if men are more likely to have crime that affects prospects of work, then its society trying to then consider those less likely to aid the negative statistics isn’t it, its logic not equality or equality would be a word forgotten in a circumstance of safety.
    answered 2018-10-15 10:59:47 +1000
    Q: Q9. Including men and boys in gender equity work
    A: Every gender should be considered for everything, should workplaces consider those who aren’t good for a job? No. Should there be 50% genders in workplaces by default, No, could the govern emend try it in their own workplaces, no , should they trail it as a gender utopia experiment , sure.. i think it is about business trying to make money not gender, if you have small hands you going to make a better Suzuki mechanic aren’t you.
    Gender equality should be considered, men’s stereotyped workplaces should have more women, why don’t they? In one of my jobs I worked in an abbitoir cutting guts to empty shit into a truck, and quite frankly I didn’t see many women licking their lips to have a go (mind you its not a job you lick your lips with until you wash your face first) i think Government need to look at gender and equality and make the playing field fairer, i still think if you went for a child care job at a preschool and got knocked back, when down to the transgender office changed genders and went for the job again it wouldn’t matter, there is going to be people making decisions based on ethics and considerations outside of what descrimination could be, its either for safety orwhos best and this should stay the same or be overhauled with everything, because if men are more likely to have crime that affects prospects of work, then its society trying to then consider those less likely to aid the negative statistics isn’t it, its logic not equality or equality would be a word forgotten in a circumstance of safety.
    answered 2018-10-15 10:44:09 +1000
    Q: Q8. Hearing men’s voices
    A: I think this is probably the most important thing, a bit like the trauma of the stolen generation culture might of had the best interactions but history and current culture are determining what is trauma as history gets played, I think current claims for equality have changed the historic thinking of value of gender but still haven’t weighed up how to fix the statistics on where gender is hurting, rather than what is availiable to harvest within each gender, both sides have to give something up, and I think males are paying the price within the statistics to the likes of suicide, and nothing is changing to make Mens rights within marriage breakdown fair, its almost as if there should be a marraige insurance which makes the contribution within marriage and net incomes the factor rather than what was already in the chute before a marraige began. No one wins in a breakdown, even culture suffers for the future when the court has got the kids university fund to shoot the other partners kneecaps out (figuratively)
    answered 2018-10-15 10:36:54 +1000
    Q: Q7. Supporting men in distress
    A: Most of all I see day to day is marriage breakdown, and financial breakdown. As in friends in my own circle have either ended it all for those reasons, or are in current distress because of it .
    For marraige breakdown, it would be handy for the assets to have a hold on for a period, having a framework to the costs of living and then the adjustment period to a financial event. or having like when you die a public trustee sell everything , share the proceeds 50/50 and do the same with access to the children , and then base the maintainance on the right to not look after the kids rather than who has them when it all goes pear shaped. I mean seriously if both people are unemployed and at home at the time of marraige breakup why would the wife be considered the primary carer by default, if the father is considered the primary candidate for work, isn’t this gender descrimination? Just saying what’s the difference?
    answered 2018-10-15 10:27:10 +1000
    Q: Q6. Supporting fathers and fatherhood
    A: And this is a great stage, and generally all is good till its not, its almost as if the culture has changed to point to men as all deviants, a cultural change to on one side identify a need for men as role models, but then paint men as inept, and stupid, and reasoning to have feminism as a positive reason and chavenisim as a negative, where both opening a door could be seen as chivalry or an insult and that this is quationed is a real cultural dilemma. Father hood and all it’s beauty are all good until marriage problems occur and this appears to be a cultural change, of which i think men have seen there are no ways to fix this, its a bit like crying equality until the tanks roll out and then men are used to fight because “we are stronger phisicallly” like really, no one would say that we are more emotionally disconnected to deal with trauma less likely statistically likely to have anxiety disorders medicated. But yeh all of these stages are important to the journey to nurturing who we have created with someone else
    answered 2018-10-15 10:10:02 +1000
    Q: Q5. Building men’s social connections
    A: This is a difficult one.. because all networks have competitiveness, and this is health to a point, having these networks are useful, but anything further then peoples outlying issues men don’t seem to respond well in part own problems vs others, and the others part tends to drop off when others problems don’t improve, making the networks useful for sounding but to a point, and this is when it would be useful to have a work based but not within industrial workplaces service to better allow those who sound others issues to call, even to call the service something like a-mate, so you can call a-mate when things get too much
    answered 2018-10-15 09:55:17 +1000
    Q: Q4. Helping men and boys make healthy transitions
    A: For myself, in the last forty years , all I have needed doing are stitches and antibiotics, ten times last twenty years maybe, however now in the forties, the creaking becomes a lot more pronounced, and maybe the anniversaries of every ten years of life might need checkups.
    Healthy stages could be becoming a dad, stress management in there somewhere (stopping excessive drinking patterns) probably best served by having methoods of focusing better on men’s mindfullness or something catered for men in the way of something similar but different, ie mindfullness on a mindsite might not take off, mindfullness in a truck on a 20min fatigue break, might be served better with a rest. I suppose more science to what men do what stops us and what stages need what would be most useful.
    answered 2018-10-15 09:47:37 +1000
    Q: Q3. Breaking down the barriers to good health
    A: For me, it isn’t the medical health system, it is everything else, mainly time and what the benefit is to the time spent, for example I went in looking for some melatonin to help aid sleep patterns, and have been twice more, one for a blood test, another for a referral to a sleep clinic, all I wanted was some better sleep (dropping off) maybe it is more the patience men don’t have to medical practice, when looking at a problem we want something fixed then promptly back making money again. Again a service that gets men to rock up, check the oil and water and see if the tensioner bearing needs some preventive maintainance
    answered 2018-10-15 09:41:27 +1000
    Q: Q2. Making health services work for men and boys
    A: It would be handy to have a one off service once or twice a year to gather a range of the most risk to male problems through a quick one off analysis service to determine how men are travelling health wise , giveing the dr a snapshot as well as the individual possibly catching some men’s health problems quicker, and changing the culture of men and medicine
    answered 2018-10-15 09:37:58 +1000
    Q: Q1. How can we empower men and boys?
    A: Mainly when marriages fall apart, or financial hardship takes hold to be aware that striking the funds of a male through either marraige breakdown or ongoing financial difficulties doesn’t save the lives of men, a financial hardship consideration would be nice
    published Men's Health Survey in Connect 2018-10-12 17:06:00 +1000